SHINGLES

 

What are Shingles?

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the same virus that causes chickenpox. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in nerve cells and can reactivate years later as shingles. 

Causes:

  • Shingles occurs when the varicella-zoster virus, which remains dormant in nerve cells after a previous chickenpox infection, becomes active again.
  • The exact triggers for reactivation are not always clear, but factors like aging, weakened immune system, stress, and certain medical conditions can increase the risk.

Symptoms:

  • The primary symptom of shingles is a painful, often severe, rash that typically appears on one side of the body or face.
  • The rash is characterized by small, fluid-filled blisters that form clusters and eventually crust over as they heal.
  • Other symptoms may include tingling, burning, itching, and localized pain before the rash appears.

Distribution:

  • The rash usually follows a specific nerve pathway, known as a dermatome. This explains why it appears in a band-like pattern on one side of the body.

Complications:

  • While most cases of shingles resolve on their own, complications can occur. These include:
    • Postherpetic Neuralgia (PHN): This is persistent nerve pain that can linger after the rash has healed. It’s the most common complication of shingles, particularly in older individuals.
    • Eye Complications: Shingles near the eye can lead to eye infections and even vision loss if not promptly treated.
    • Other Complications: Shingles can rarely affect internal organs, leading to issues like pneumonia or inflammation of the brain.

Diagnosis:

  • Diagnosis is often based on the appearance of the rash and the associated symptoms.
  • In some cases, laboratory tests such as viral cultures or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests may be done to confirm the presence of the virus.

Treatment:

  • Antiviral medications, such as acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir, are commonly prescribed to shorten the duration of the infection, reduce pain, and minimize the risk of complications.
  • Pain relievers, antihistamines, and topical treatments can help manage discomfort and itching associated with the rash.

Vaccination:

  • The shingles vaccine (Shingrix) is recommended for individuals aged 50 and older to reduce the risk of developing shingles and its associated complications.
  • Vaccination can also help prevent or lessen the severity of postherpetic neuralgia.

If you suspect you have shingles, it’s important to seek medical attention promptly. Early treatment can help alleviate symptoms, speed up healing, and reduce the risk of complications.

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